Dryden an essay on dramatic poesy summary

Crites objects to rhyme in plays: "since no man without premeditation speaks in rhyme, neither ought he to do it on the stage." He cites Aristotle as saying that it is, "best to write tragedy in that kind of verse . . which is nearest prose" as a justification for banishing rhyme, from drama in favor of blank verse (unrhymed iambic pentameter). Even though blank verse lines are no more spontaneous than are rhymed lines, they are still to be preferred because they are "nearest nature": "Rhyme is incapable of expressing the greatest thought naturally, and the lowest it cannot with any grace: for what is more unbefitting the majesty of verse, than to call a servant, or bid a door be shut in rhyme?"


Key-Terms:

• structure and    development
• lyric poetry
    • elegy
    • ode
    • sonnet
    • dramatic        monologue
    • occasional        poetry
    • epithalamion
• narrative    poetry
    • epic
    • mock-epic
    • ballad
• descriptive    poetry
• dramatic    poetry
• didactic poetry
• prodesse et delectare

Dryden an essay on dramatic poesy summary

dryden an essay on dramatic poesy summary

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